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Apple Begins Cracking Down on App Piracy, Sends Takedown Notices to Apptrackr

Apple Begins Cracking Down on App Piracy, Sends Takedown Notices to Apptrackr

Apple has begun targeting Apptrackr, a popular service known for questionable distribution of App Store apps, reports CultofMac, and has recently issued several takedown notices.

Apptrackr has issued an official blog post to their mobile service, stating that Apple was carefully checking the service for links to App Store content, and issuing a takedown notice for each offending app or piece of content.

The group responded by adding CAPTCHA tags to all of their outbound links, and has also revealed plans to move their servers outside of copyright law jurisdiction. From CultofMac:

The cost of international server hosting has forced Apptrackr to introduce mobile advertisements. The site noted that it can no longer survive on donations alone. New hosts will also be added soon to help distribute cracked apps to the masses.

Apptrackr and other similar service pose substantial difficulties for people like Apple, and unfortunately there’s not much Apple can do about people cracking App Store apps and making them available elsewhere.

Piracy will always exist. It will never be defeated, mainly because active software pirates are resourceful, and tend to only become more creative with every attempt to put a stop to them. Many of them are also outside of legal jurisdiction.

This should be taken as good news, however, as it may at least temporarily help to relieve some app developers who have lost a lot of money to app piracy. Unfortunately, any solution will likely only be temporary.

  1. Stu Mitchell says:

    Whilst I don’t have a great deal of sympathy for the larger software corporations, the AppStore contains a lot of contributions from smaller, one-man-band type operations that survive on income. If you add that to the cheap cost of apps – as we know, many down to 69p/99c, the notion of piracy on iOS is, I would argue, more unethical than other platforms.

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