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Confirmed: AT&T Will Soon Begin Revoking Data Plans For Some Jailbroken iPhone Users

Confirmed: AT&T Will Soon Begin Revoking Data Plans For Some Jailbroken iPhone Users

It appears that AT&T has now confirmed that it will soon begin revoking unlimited data plans from users of jailbroken iPhones who use “unauthorized” tethering and mobile hotspot solutions.

AT&T has already made a habit of sending out threatening text messages to such users, and will now be taking it to the next level. AT&T claims to expressly prohibit such actions in their terms and conditions. An AT&T spokesperson was quote as saying the following:

Earlier this year, we began sending letters, emails, and text messages to a small number of smartphone customers who use their devices for tethering but aren’t on our required tethering plan. Our goal here is fairness for all of our customers…The letter outlines three choices for customers who had been making use of unauthorized tethering solutions, one of which is “Do nothing and we’ll go ahead and add the tethering plan on their behalf — after the date noted in their customer notification.

Fairness for all customers, eh AT&T? I don’t think so. Charging your users an extra $20 each month for tethering data they already paid for? Relying on technicalities within carefully-worded documents (that users have no choice but to sign if they want service) to prevent plans that AT&T advertised as “unlimited” from actually being unlimited? Forcing your customers onto ridiculously-priced tiered data plans if they don’t comply with your absurd demands? That doesn’t meet my definition of fairness, AT&T.

Charging an addition monthly fee for tethering is obscene. It is a greedy, misguided, unfair, and unfortunately all-too-common practice that, in the end, only hurts their customers. Further, AT&T’s terms of service are very coercive, and, unlike a typical legal contract, are decided, enforced by, and very much in the favor of AT&T, not their customers.

AT&T may argue that consumers can choose to go to another service, but that’s really not a choice for everybody. Some people must use a certain carrier because their job requires it. Some people can only get decent reception with a certain carrier. Instead of spending so much time and effort crafting such ridiculous and obscene policies, why not simply use a small portion of your vast resources to actually improve your network so this kind of nonsense isn’t necessary?

For people that subscribed to AT&T’s unlimited plans back when the word unlimited actually meant as much, this policy is selfish, unfair, and essentially rather dishonest of AT&T.

How much abuse will AT&T have to dish out before consumers are willing to stand up for themselves, have lawyers look over their service contracts and pester AT&T, and for consumers that do have the choice to go elsewhere for service until AT&T changes their ways?

  1. Think about it for a minute.. Those who are jailbroken to tether probably know more about what they’re doing since they had to be all tech savvy to set it up and learn how to use it. These are the ones who probably tend to use more obscene amounts of data than the casual user.

    Sure, the data may be paid for under the unlimited plan, but this is unlimited specifically to that particular device. In theory, the extra cost of the tethering plan is paying to use your paid-for data on multiple devices, via your iPhone or iPad. Think of it as a convenience fee.

    I had a similar feeling when the iPhone first came out. You could purchase a data plan for your not-smart phone, but you had to pay more for the exact same concept for an iPhone. Why? Because it’s practically inevitable that MORE data would be used. But really, it just makes sense. Technology improves, people jump on it, and it begins to cost more to maintain.

    Unlimited is rarely actually “unlimited” no matter where you go. This includes most web hosting plans that pride themselves on offering unlimited this or unlimited that. It’s all under the assumption that customers will just use the service as necessary. When there’s no cap, people go all willy-nilly doing everything possible, perhaps just because they can, which bogs down the service quality for the rest of us. And I’m pretty sure we’re all paying for quality. You want more, you pay more. When is that NOT the case?

    1. AT&T Sucks says:

      2nd that. You are and idiot.

    2. Anonymous says:

      That is a ridiculous assumption.  You must work for AT&T.  If you don’t, you should check to see if they are hiring — you’d fit right in.

  2. Think about it for a minute.. Those who are jailbroken to tether probably know more about what they’re doing since they had to be all tech savvy to set it up and learn how to use it. These are the ones who probably tend to use more obscene amounts of data than the casual user.

    Sure, the data may be paid for under the unlimited plan, but this is unlimited specifically to that particular device. In theory, the extra cost of the tethering plan is paying to use your paid-for data on multiple devices, via your iPhone or iPad. Think of it as a convenience fee.

    I had a similar feeling when the iPhone first came out. You could purchase a data plan for your not-smart phone, but you had to pay more for the exact same concept for an iPhone. Why? Because it’s practically inevitable that MORE data would be used. But really, it just makes sense. Technology improves, people jump on it, and it begins to cost more to maintain.

    Unlimited is rarely actually “unlimited” no matter where you go. This includes most web hosting plans that pride themselves on offering unlimited this or unlimited that. It’s all under the assumption that customers will just use the service as necessary. When there’s no cap, people go all willy-nilly doing everything possible, perhaps just because they can, which bogs down the service quality for the rest of us. And I’m pretty sure we’re all paying for quality. You want more, you pay more. When is that NOT the case?

  3. Dewdana says:

    I think that is more fair than throttling users who use the data ON their iPhone. Although the dataplan is unlimited that was established assuming the user would access the data directly through their device which in and of itself limits the volume because on the interface. I think charging separately for text messaging which reduces their network traffic (assuming it prevents phone and emails from being used) and *IS* data is far more obscene. I pay $10/mo for 1000txts and even if each one were 1KB then why am I paying $10 for 1MB of data if I have an unlimited ‘data plan’. That is of course the contract I signed and I can’t fault them for it, but it is greedy and far more obscene than the extra $20 they are looking to get from tether users who use ALOT of data. Just my two cents.

    1. Great point, I almost forgot about that ridiculousness! I certainly have used way less “air time” since I started texting (back in like 2001, haha)

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